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Small Kitchen Remodeling: 7 Tips For Successful Projects

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Planning a small kitchen remodeling project? Check out our tips to set yourself up for success.

  1. Tailor your remodeling projects to how you actually use the room. If you don’t cook much, but mostly eat out and heat up bought food, then maybe the cooking area can shrink in favor of the kids homework area, because that’s more important and useful to your household. If you grow a lot of food and spend days canning, then space for that may be a priority. The pretty-picture kitchens are designed for priorities which may be completely different from yours.
  2. Design yourself at least one decent sized counter area. 30″ is big enough for one person to do most prep, baking and cooking tasks, though more space would be better. If you break up all your counter space into little bits and pieces less than 30″, you’ll feel cramped with every job you do.
  3. Don’t bite off more than you can chew. What are you planning – a complete gut job with total replacement of everything from the studs in? Individual projects which add up to a makeover? Make sure you’re budgetng time and money in a way you can sustain.
  4. Consider smaller-than-standard appliances. Most of today’s trends are towards larger rather than smaller – giant pro-style gas ranges, wide french door fridges, huge farm sinks. If your kitchen is small, these oversized styles may be counterproductive. Apartment-sized appliances may do everything you need and give you more working space (18″ dishwashers, 24″ ranges, undercounter fridges). Or, you may want one star appliance to be larger-than-life, and the others to be slimmed-down to make space.
  1. Don’t try to squeeze too much into the kitchen. While the glossy magazines are full of great ideas for special-purpose areas like beverage and snack centers, baking centers, butlers pantries, etc, they mostly work in large kitchens. In a small kitchen, focus on the essentials – cooking, prep, cleanup and storage – and keep the feeling as spacious as possible.
  2. Try laying your flooring diagonally. Whether tiles or planks, in wahetever materials, diagonal laying is a classic method to get longer lines and the perceptiopn of more space.
  3. Consider lighting. Good lighting can make a small space seem bigger, while inadequate lighting can make a large space seem unfriendly or smaller than it really is. Task lighting is especially important, so include under-cabinet lights for your wall cabinets in your plans.

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Kitchen Island Designs: 6 Must-Know Tips

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If you’re planning an island in your new or remodeled kitchen, there are some potential pitfalls and some important things you need to know before you start.

  • Don’t create a barrier island. One of the biggest pitfalls in kitchen island designs is planning an island which sits bang on the major work pathway from range to fridge, fridge to sink, or sink to range. If you have to keep walking round an island – especially a big one – to get where you need to go, you’ll hate it.
  • Research plumbing, electrical and range-venting requirements carefully before including a range or sink in the island. These issues can make or break the island’s position, and add substantially to costs if it’s awkward to get water to a sink, or drainage and vent stacks, or hood vents. Even if you can drop a vent hood directly over an island range, will it destroy your desired sight lines?
  • Don’t feel tied to using the same cabinet finishes or countertop on the island as you do in the rest of the kitchen. You can use different colors, different woods, different materials on the island, although styles should be at least compatible (however you define that). Using special-purpose counter materials like butcherblock or marble is also a great opportunity not to be wasted.
  • Your island doesn’t have to be fixed down (unless it contains plumbing, gas or electrical). You can use a big harvest table as an island, where you can sit down to work; a butcher block; even a kitchen island cart which can be rolled away against the wall when you want floor space more than island workspace.
  • An island can be very useful for protecting the main workspace from traffic flow. If you can divert traffic around one side of the island and have the range and sink on the other side, it reduces cook-pedestrian collision potential greatly.
  • Islands don’t have to be all one level, or at standard counter height. While you may want to have part of the island at standard counter height, other possibilities include: lower or highewr than standard counters: standard table height, for eating; breakfast bar height, for eating, leaning, and to make a space for guests to chat but stay out of the way; kiddie work height; adjustable height; wheelchair accessible workspace height.
  • If your kitchen is big enough for a really big island (especially a LONG one), consider breaking it up into two islands with a passageway between. This means you don’t have to walk a long way to get round the island, but can cut through the middle, and it also offers the potential for different heights, counter materials and uses for the two different islands, as well as offering separate workstations for multiple cooks.
  • You can easily DIY a simple island (no sink, range etc.) into your existing kitchen if there’s enough space, using some RTA cabinets (base or wall) and a ready-made counter.

More on kitchen island designs:

Custom Kitchen Islands

Island Kitchen Layouts

Kitchen Islands and Carts

Kitchen Island Designs

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Kitchen Pantry Makeover: From Black Hole to Pantry Storage

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Back when I bought this house in 2005, the first thing I did was rip out the bathroom completely, so I needed somewhere close by to store tools. Just outside the kitchen was a closet built out over the top of the basement stairs, which was shallow at the bottom and deep at the top, lined with waferboard, and shelved with unfinished pieces of cedar siding. Perfect for tools. So it became the tool pantry.

Pantry full of tools

Pantry full of tools

Once the bathroom was (almost) finished and I was joined by a new partner, it became obvious that the tool pantry needed to become a food pantry. So we bought an IKEA cabinet which would fit near the current center of remodeling operations (it never ends when you have a house built in the 1930′s), moved all the tools into that and organized them much better, and emptied everything out of the pantry, including all the shelves and shelf supports.

Empty pantry left side

Empty pantry left side

While the picture is pretty boring, you can see the odd angles of the walls, the strange varnished waferboard interior (partial – the inside of the door wall was just studs) and perhaps the dinged-up state of the door. You can’t see the horrid baby blue peeling paint on the door frame. Lucky you!

Because we wanted a vertical back wall to hang shelves on, I cut the back panel part way up, pulled it out, added vertical studs, and refitted the panel. I ended up with a strange angled join because of the non-rectangular nature of the space, but never mind. We won’t see it when everything is painted and the shelves are in… will we?

Pantry back wall now vertical

Pantry back wall now vertical

As you can see I caulked around all the joints since everything was very badly fitting and I wanted to keep out bugs migrating from the attic above or the basement below. Well, I can hope, yes?

Inside of pantry door wall

Inside of pantry door wall

As well as rebuilding the back wall, I finished off the inside of the door wall as well. You may be wondering why the wall is that horrid pink color. And is that ceramic tile above the door? No, it’s sponge-painted faux tile on masonite paneling that came out of the bathroom, which was that color when I bought the house. It’s an improvement on raw studs, but wait: there’s more!

Pantry interior painted white

Pantry interior painted white

It looks a lot better with everything painted white inside, but those funny angles still make you feel a bit seasick, eh? I kept assuring my partner that we wouldn’t see it once the shelves were in, but I’m not sure I was believed!

The next stage after painting (3 coats all over everything) was to clean up the door (you can see I’ve started filling holes in the picture above) and scrape the loose paint off the frame. That was not a fun job as while the various layers weren’t sticking well enough to each other in many places to be painted over, they still held well enough that it took a carbide scraper to get them off!

 

Pantry shelving test

Pantry shelving test

Here’s the inside with the first set of metal standards installed, and the unfinished plywood shelves installed to test for size before we painted them. Door frame scraping in progress.

And now, the completed pantry!

Pantry door with left and back pantry shelving

Pantry door with left and back pantry shelving

Back and right side pantry shelving

Back and right side pantry shelving

The shallow shelves on the right are 3-4″ deep and just fit against the door frame. They are so we can store as much of our canning there as possible just one jar deep, and be able to see what we have and eat it rather than leaving it in the basement and forgetting about it!

Finally, here’s the completed pantry full of food.

Pantry left and rear with contents

Pantry left and rear with contents

Center-right pantry shelving

Center-right pantry shelving

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Design Your Own House

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It is exhilarating when you make the decision to design your own house, but it can also be overwhelming.

There are so many options to weigh, so many vastly different styles to chose from and it can seem impossible to find a starting point. Luckily, there are many online resources available to you once you make the decision to start this exciting process. From online tools to help you design your own home, to websites representing professionals for hire, everything you could possibly need to make your dream a reality can be found on the internet.

Now, where to begin?

First, you should take stock of what you find aesthetically pleasing and start from there. Try doing a search online for images of houses, starting perhaps at an architectural reference site. Once you have found out the name of the style that most appeals to you, begin thinking about the size. You can think in terms of number of rooms and the basic measurements you are interested in. It would be wise to keep a list, or several lists of things as they occur to you so that you can take them to the architect, should you choose to hire one.

Once you have a firm grasp on the size and style of the house as a whole, look into websites that will allow you to design a room online. Think of how many windows you might want, and how much storage, as well as the layout and flow that best suits your sensibilities. It is useful to clip photographs from magazines and home journals that illustrate what you want and keep them with your lists, perhaps in an album or scrapbook. Once you have found your basic idea, size and style use one of the many  resources available to design your own home online, such as a consultancy firm that can give you quotes on how much it will cost. These services can also refer you to a contractor to take care of the practical aspects of your project. Perhaps you could find an architect online to help you design your own home, too, which could be useful insofar as they can help streamline your ideas into a cohesive vision. They can also help you position your home on the intended parcel to give it the best look from the exterior.

If you are persistent and keep your original idea in mind, you can make the most of these online resources to design your home. It is a very exciting prospect, but with a little planning and utilizing these online resources you can minimize your stress and make your dream come alive.

Once your project is underway you can continue to use online resources to design your rooms. It is helpful, too, because if you use the same resources you can work from your original plan and keep tabs on what will and won’t work with your final design. In the end, you will be very happy that you took the time and trouble to design your own home since it will be unlike any other.

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Extreme Home Makeovers for Your Home

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Many homeowners are deciding to renovate their homes after watching how easy simple renovations can be on television shows like ABC’s Extreme Home Makeover. If this sounds like you, then read on for great home makeover ideas.

A great room has lots of personality, but finding great pieces to showcase your personality does not have to cost a fortune. Many times on Extreme Home Makeover, the designers will scour flea markets for their rooms. Patience is key with finding wonderful items for a cheap price. Sometimes all a room needs is a beautiful rug, a few throw pillows, or a coat of paint to give it a refreshed look.

A home makeover doesn’t have to consist of completely ripping down your home and starting over, a lot of great renovations can be cheap and quick, such as purchasing new lighting for a room, or adding new handles and knobs to old furniture and simply polishing old wood.

If you are feeling particularly creative, consider spending an afternoon adding a nice wallpaper border to your kitchen. A lot of wallpaper borders now are simply cut and stick, which saves wallpaper paste and time. Measure your room and cut your wallpaper border to size. When ready to apply, use a yard stick to smooth the paper onto your wall as you go, creating a smooth, uniform look. This will also help prevent air bubbles in the paper.

Another great kitchen renovation is changing your cabinets. As mentioned before, this can be accomplished by simply changing your handles. If you are looking for a great change, you can always repaint or refinish your cabinets. This can be a long job, but very worth it if you are looking for something new. Sand your cabinets down to remove old lacquer and paint. Once sanded, wipe them down gently with a damp rag to remove any bits of debris. Then you are ready to paint or stain them. For paint, the general rule is to use at least two coats, allowing it to dry in between coats. For stain, it may take up to five or six, depending on the depth of color you want.

A home makeover can also consist of putting in new flooring for your home. A lot of flooring stores offer plans to help you do it yourself, from pre cutting the wood to match your measurements, or coming out to help you. A great cost effective way to change your flooring is to buy linoleum in a nice color or pattern and use it to refresh your home.

A typical homeowner can find many ways to give his or her own home an extreme home makeover, from these tips mentioned above and many other ways to refresh their surroundings.

 

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Installing Replacement Windows for Your Kitchen

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Installing replacement windows in your home may improve its appearance, raise your home’s value, and save on energy.  It is a somewhat difficult process and takes about four hours per window, depending on whether or not you are changing sizes, but can be completed by any homeowner.  There aren’t many tools required but you need at least two people to complete the job with any ease.  The benefits are numerous and the appearance and weatherization should make installing replacement windows very worth your time and money.

If your replacement windows are the same size as your older windows then you won’t have to alter any framing.  They windows will fit right into the existing frame. This will be the case if you have measured your existing window openings and ordered custom-sized replacement windows – or if you are lucky enough to have existing windows the same size as standard replacements!

If your new windows are different sized, though, you will have to buy lumber and reframe your window in order for the replacement window to fit.  This requires measuring the new window and altering the standing frame to a size that will hold the new replacement windows.  This is called re-framing, and you will need to remove the existing window to do it.

While installing replacement windows you need certain tools.  A measuring tape, a chalk line, a jigsaw, 2 1/4 inch screws, holding tape (some people use it, it holds the framing together so drilling can take place), a shim or a flat pry bar, a caulking gun, paint scraper, utility knife, putty knife, drill, and a  hammer.   The process takes about two or three hours per window.  Of course, if you are on the second story you need a scaffold or several sturdy ladders.

Types of Replacement Windows

There are three different varieties of replacement windows.

Sash-replacement kits give old frames more modern features.  You can use these if the existing window frame is level and square. As the name implies, the existing sash is replced by a new one and the structural framing and the window jambs don’t need to be altered. This is by far the easiest method, but because the new sash will very likely have thicker frames than the existing sash, you will lose a small amount of glass area. On the other hand, the new sash can can include modern glass features like double or triple glazing or low-e coatings.

The next kind is an insert replacement window.  An insert replacement window comes with a ready to install secondary frame.  These fasten to the old jambs and easily slip in.

The third kind of replacement window is a full frame, possibly the best replacement windows, and is like the insert replacement window except it comes with its’ own jambs.

Installation

Installing replacement windows requires good measurements, most importantly.  How to measure for replacement windows is a science.  You measure the width and then you measure the height.  Miscalculating these numbers can cost you valuable time and energy so measure very carefully.  You measure from the inside and measure the bottom, middle, and top.

Next, remove the old window and begin the replacement window installation process.  First remove the stops with the tool of your choice.  Some people keep them so they can use them for the replacement windows. Then remove the parting beads (if any) and the sash.

Finally, it is time to begin installing the replacement windows.  Use the detailed installation instructions that came with your windows! Clean the frame, caulk the frame, and install your window.  Make sure it is flush and tap in the shims.  Most people don’t tap them in all the way because they may need to be removed later.  Screw in the mounting screws at the bottom and top, close any gaps by moving the header up, test the window, and apply the final caulking.

Your installed replacement windows will be beautiful and energy efficient.  Taking only a few hours, it produces long lasting results. A relatively easy job, installing replacement windows is a great way to improve a room and add value to your home.

 

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Kitchen Backsplash Ideas

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Changing the backsplash can make an amazing difference to a boring-looking kitchen. If your kitchen is basically OK – the layout works and the cabinets and finishes are in good shape, but the whole thing lacks pizazz – putting in a new backsplash is one of the easiest ways to make over the space.

This article covers a wide range of kitchen backsplash ideas that you can use in your own kitchen, either as part of a larger-scale kitchen makeover, or as a single project. Of course, you can also use them when remodeling ir building a brand new kitchen!

Existing Kitchen Backsplash Tile

Existing plain tile can be jazzed up without ripping out the whole thing. From least to most work:

  • Add transfers, stickers or painted motifs to some plain tiles right where they are
  • Hang a large flat object over the tiles: a platter, picture, photo, print, tray, laminated fabric or wallpaper panel, placemat, large single tile or plaque, or a shadow box. Make sure if you’re hanging it where it may get splashed, that it’s easily cleanable, and if it’s going behind the range, that it’s non-flammable and won’t get damaged by grease splashes.
  • Add a border or molding tile to the top of the backsplash, or wood molding
  • Install removable glass or clear plastic rigid sheet panels over top of the tile, in such a way that you can insert wallpaper or fabric behind the glass.
  • Install a new backsplash right over the top of the old tiles, using tile, wood, metal or other materials
  • Remove single tiles in a random or ordered pattern, and insert new tiles in a contrast or complementary color or pattern

Creating a New Backsplash

If you’re working on a fresh backsplash area, or you’ve ripped out the old one to put in a brand new one, you have lots of options.

Kitchen Backsplash Tile Designs

There are a huge number of ways to lay out tile. Using an unusual layout or arrangement can make even the most basic tile look special. Here are some possibilities, shown in black and white with tan grout but can be laid out in any color scheme:

Square tiles set on point, with smaller squares at meeting corners

Square tiles set on point, with smaller squares at meeting corners

These are plain square tiles set “on point” so they look like diamonds, with smaller squares set into the meeting points.The small and large squares can contrast or blend in color; you can use very special small tiles with plain, more economical large tiles; you could use textured small tiles, or pebbles or round glass blobs, even stars or other unusual shapes set into teh grout square formed by the cut off corners of the larger squares.

This design requires that every large tile has to have all its corners accurately cut off. That’s a lot of cutting. To reduce the amount of cutting, you can dispense with the small squares completely and use patterned or textured tiles for the large squares, or a checkerboard or other color pattern for the large squares. You could also only have small squares at the points every second or third large square instead of every one.

Square tiles with small diamonds at meeting corners

Square tiles with small diamonds at meeting corners

This design uses exactly the same shapes as the one above, but the design is at 45 degrees. There is less cutting of the large tiles at the edges of the design. All the same variations as above can be used.

Several different colors of glass tile would look especially good in this design: perhaps several tones of blue in the larger tiles, with green, purple, yellow or red tones for the small tiles.

Grout colors can make a surprising amount of difference to how your tile design looks. A grout color which blends with one tile color will have a very different effect from one that blends with another tile color, or that contrasts with all the tile colors.

Tile size can also make a big difference to the look: this pattern could be made the usual way using 6″ tile for the large tiles, or you could use much smaller field tiles (2″, with dots for the small diamonds) or much larger, like 12″, which for a backsplash would give you two rows of large tiles with only one row of small diamonds down the middle.

Subway tile set in running bond

Subway tile set in running bond

Subway tiles are very fashionable now, and you can get them not only in traditional white, but many other colors, plus different sizes. Again, grout color combined with tile colors can have different effects, and while the traditional way to use subway tile is in a single color (with perhaps a band or border at the top or bottom), you can use different colors to make designs within the running bond brick-like pattern.

Historic subway tile was flat all over, whereas modern tile has a “pillowy” look to it, with the center higher than the edges. You can still get the flat type but historical accuracy will cost you more, so only get it if you need it.

Subway-type tiles are available in various sizes and proportions, and different materials like stone as well as ceramic tiles, as these pictures show:

Stone tiles with textured copper tile band at the top

Stone tiles with textured copper tile band at the top

Elongated subway tiles with band of textured stone strips at the top

Elongated subway tiles with band of textured stone strips at the top

Grey marble backsplash design with mosaic band and molding above

Grey marble backsplash design with mosaic band and molding above

Design ideas above by Powell River Custom Tile and Marble

Tiles are available in many materials and many sizes: ceramic, stone of many kinds, and glass: large and small, square, rectangular, hexagonal, harlequin diamonds, mosaic in patterns and random shades, even custom mosaic color patterns.

More tile ideas include:

  • feature tiles in strategic places, using a few expensive antique or handmade tiles in a field of mostly economical tile
  • tiled niches behind counters, sinks or ranges
  • using quilt patterns as feature areas, assembled from cut squares and triangles of tile
  • multi-section painted tile pictures and scenes

More Backsplash Materials

Anything you can use on a counter can be used on a backsplash, either to match or contrast with the counter. Solid surfacing, laminate, granite, terrazo, recycled glass, quartz – in some cases you can get the material in thinner sheets to use on the backsplash, which is less expensive than the thicker countertop material.

Flooring material can also make a good backsplash, and you can sometimes come across great deals where someone has a stash which is not enough for a floor, but plenty for a backsplash. Wood, stone, cork or bamboo flooring: laminate in wood or stone patterns: even sheet vinyl or genuine linoleum can all be used.

Metals can also make a great backsplash. Stainless steel is fashionable at the moment, and can be used flat or in various textures: other metal sheeting like copper can look great, especially in a hammered finish: patterned metal “tin” ceiling tiles can be pressed into service, though watch out for too much texture where it will be hard to clean. There are even plastic lookalike “metal” ceiling tiles which might be usable if they are tough enough.

Glass can make an excellent tough backsplash and can be used in several ways. Clear glass panels with changeable color/pattern panels behind them make it easy to change your mind about color and pattern. Mirrors, either sheet or tiles, clear or smoked, can open up a room in interesting ways when used below wall cabinets. Clear flass can be frosted or sandblasted, evenly or in patterns: textured glass can be backpainted or used over colored or patterned panels. Even windows can be inserted into the backsplash area, although you need to be very careful about how they will look from the outside. Glass block works well if you would end up gazing out onto an unpleasant view through your backsplash windows. It’s also possible to use clear plastic sheet instead of glass: however, it tends to scratch and doesn’t wear as well as glass. Obviously you’d want to use safety glass in case of breakage.

Wood makes a fine backsplash material and can give you several very different looks. Beadboard can look country or historic, usually painted, but you could clear finish it. Unusual veneers, protected with a clear finish, and using alternating grain directions for even more variety, could look stunning. Even extra doors to match your cabinet doors could be used. Wood can be coated with a variety of finishes for different effects: dark or light natural stains, colored stains, paint or clear polyurethane. Just watch out for “too much” wood if your cabinets and floor are also wood!

Brick backsplashes have to be sealed in some way otherwise they soak up food stains irreversibly, but if you can do that they can look great.

As you can see, the kitchen backsplash ideas available to you are almost unlimited and it’s usually quite simple to retrofit them into an existing kitchen. Have fun with your backsplash – it’s something you’ll be spending quite a lot of time looking at as you work at your counters!

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Granite Countertop Colors

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Granite countertops have moved from dream-house luxury to a standard kitchen material within the past decade or two.  The only question for many homeowners now is what color granite to buy for the new kitchen’s countertops. Do they want dark and shiny, warm and earthy, light and creamy, or bright and gaudy. Homeowners can find something in almost any color of granite for medium to high-budget remodels.

The available colors of granite range from the near-black of “Absolute Black” through the bright blue and rust abstract swirls of the aptly named “Van Gogh” to almost pure white. Mass-market retailers usually carry a small range of colors of granite in the most popular and affordable colors. If you want something different, you need to find a stone yard. To see the full range available, search online and check several stone merchants. Geology being what it is, there is far more gray and cream granite than brilliantly colored granite. Be warned; some of the rare granite colors, especially the blue shades, are expensive. If you fall in love with a budget-busting granite, consider using it for a very small, but prominent countertop and use an inexpensive coordinating color of granite for the remaining countertops.

After picking a color range, the next question is what texture and particle size you want to use. Granite textures can be an almost uniform monochrome, salt and pepper speckled like the classic Rosa Beta, veined like marble, or wildly mottled like Harlequin. The grain can be small and almost uniform, can contain large crystalline inclusions like Snowflake, or can even look like it has whole pebbles embedded in it like the Marinacce and Mosaic granites.

Maintaining your countertop surface is always an issue. The mottled neutral colors of some granite countertops, such as those made from Santa Cecilia granite, disguise the water spots and small stains that make maintaining dark granites a daily task. A high-gloss Absolute Black, on the other hand, will show every particle of dust that lands on it. The pale cream and white granites may need sealing to avoid staining when colored foods are spilled on them.

Granite has a color and pattern for the countertops of any style home, and a price for almost any budget. If your home is traditional, use the classic speckled gray and beige granite colors, or the classic blacks, whites, and creams with slight veining. Contemporary kitchens look good with countertops in the more lively stones such as Baltic Brown, the mottled Juperanas, Santa Cecilia, or even the pebble-filled Marinacce granites. If your decor is ultra modern, the pure simplicity of the pure black marbles such as Absolute Black might appeal to you. Or go ultra-edgy with the wild Van Gogh and other gaudy granite colors if your budget can handle the price.

Where do they get the names for granite? Some are named for the towns the quarry is near, some are named for the appearance of the granite, and some are named by the quarry’s marketing staff to make an ordinary granite sound special. “Snowflake Black” not only sounds better than “New Hampshire Plutonic Suite granite”, it’s easier to imagine what it looks like.

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Quartz Countertops

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As far as Kitchen remodeling goes you have multiple different aspects that must be paid attention to. Besides cabinetry, flooring, paint, and furniture you have counter tops to worry about.

If you want something well worth the money you should try quartz counter tops. Not only are you going to get an immaculate addition to your newly redone kitchen. You will be choosing a natural product with elegant charm. Its natural beauty will help complete your new kitchen. It comes in many different colors some companies even offer up to 50 different color choices. Ranging from dark to light color you will have more than enough to choose from to make your kitchen remodel a success.

One place to find the quartz countertops would be a local home center such as a Lowes Home Improvement, or a Home Depot. You can also call local remodeling business in your area and see if they can provide you with local quartz counter top providers. Be sure to shop around and get the best price and quality. Don’t settle with looking at just one company you need to look at a few different places also see if you can get a discount on installation if you order from a certain company. Prices usually range from $50-$90 installed.

Quartz counter tops must be professionally installed. They are also very hygienic and a great surface for cooking and preparing food on. Quartz is heavier than other stone tops such as granite but it is also more durable. Quartz is also more flexible than other stones which makes instillation easier and faster. Common brands and providers of quartz counter tops are Caesarstone, Zodiac, Silestone, Technistone, Legacy, Cambria but they are not limited to that.

Quartz counter tops are stain resistant to items such as wine, fruit juices, liquid food coloring, tea, nail polish and remover, and felt-tip markers. Other Counter top materials are not as resistant to stains. It can be damaged by high heat or prolonged exposure to heat. With any other stone or surface material, strong chemicals and solvents such as Drano, Liquid Plumber, oven cleaners and floor strippers will damage the surface. So be very careful when cleaning your new counter tops or things around it. Continuous long-term exposure to direct sunlight may result in slight discoloration of Quartz Stone countertops.

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Kitchen Paint Colors

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Choosing kitchen paint colors seems an easy enough task, but once you start looking at the vast area of colors available, it can be a little overwhelming. The kitchen tends to be one of those rooms where people gather for conversation, family games, and holidays. The color of a room can make people feel happy or sad or anxious. Think of that dull green of hospitals that was so common years ago. This has been replaced in many hospitals with bright yellow because administrators realize that color plays a key role in illness and depression.

Home improvement centers and paint stores are full of color samples and cards to help you choose. But there are so many, so here are some kitchen color ideas to help you choose the right one.

First, begin by looking at the other kitchen paint colors in the room. For instance, if your cabinets are a dark colored wood, a bright yellow or green would not be appropriate. Other examples of things to be considered are the presence of stainless steel appliances, countertop colors, whether or not the room has wallpaper or chair rails. Are there windows or doors in the room? Do you want the same colors for those or would you prefer a contrasting color? All these things must be considered before choosing your kitchen paint colors.

The important part of choosing kitchen paint colors is to compliment the other items in the room, not take away from them. For some kitchen color schemes and ideas, first visit your local paint store and get some sample cards. Hold them against the cabinets and appliances in the room to get a general idea of what looks good, what kitchen paint colors you like and what seem to go best with your other furnishings. Ask yourself what exactly you hope to achieve with the new paint color. If you’re looking to make the kitchen seem bigger, choose a brighter color such as a birght yellow or green. If you want a cozier feel, choose a warm color such as tan or muted blue.

Wallpaper can compliment these colors, but choose carefully. Avoid stripes or dots and go for something that will blend in, not be spotlighted. You want people to feel relaxed and at ease during their meals and color can greatly influence this. Don’t choose anything too distracting.

The kitchen should be a peaceful yet happy place and the color you choose will be important. Also, remember that if you already have white trim around doors and windows, these will look great with your new wall paint colors so plan on sprucing these up at the same time. If they are not painted white, this may be a good time to paint them. Nothing looks better than bright white trim! Once you’ve done this, narrow down your choices to two or three colors that you really prefer and then revisit the paint store. Ask for or purchase a small amount of each of the paint colors and then paint a small area of the room with these colors. See the colors in different light situations and at different times of day. Get other family members opinions and ideas.

Once you decide the color, you must then decide what type of finish you want. A flat finish looks beautiful and smooth, but is not good for clean ups. The best paint for kitchens seems to be a satin or semi-gloss paint. This can easily be wiped down and cleaned which is important in the kitchen, where grease, smoke and odors can dull the paint.

Choosing kitchen paint colors can be overwhelming, but with the above tips, you will hopefully have an easier time. Remember also that the employees in the paint store can help you too!

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